TRAC

TRAC School Project

Keeping young pedestrians safe

With pedestrian fatalities still a major concern on all South African roads, Trans African Concessions (TRAC) is committed to educating the general public about safety.

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The statistics for pedestrian deaths in the rainbow nation are staggering – the latest figures show that 35% to 40% of road-accident fatalities are people who journey on foot. These are frightening stats, especially since such a large percentage is children.

When it comes to road safety, TRAC believes in empowering the communities, especially those who are most vulnerable on the road. That is why the concessionaire has launched numerous safety campaigns that focus mainly on children. TRAC believes that in making youngsters more knowledgeable on the rules of the road will help them create a safer environment for themselves, while at the same time, spreading the word to the adults in their lives.

Most of the communities on TRAC’s route are based in rural areas, where public transport is most commonly used. A school project which focuses solely on basic pedestrian safety was launched at the beginning of 2015. The ongoing initiative – as with all the school road-safety projects and activations – will be led by TRAC’s much-adored mascot, Sipho. It consists of a talk on TRAC, TRACAssist and the N4 Toll Route as well as a video clip focusing on basic pedestrian safety.

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During each activation children are encouraged to practise good pedestrian safety and all the youngsters receive a goodie pack containing sweets, a recycled stationery set and a luminous TRAC-branded wrist band. The latter is a high-visibility item and kids are urged to wear them when walking at night to help motorists notice them when they are on the road.

Phase one was rolled out in the Lowveld region of Mpumalanga and the first school TRAC visited was Kaapmuiden Primary in Nkomazi. More than 300 learners between five and 12 were reached and the school management and staff all commended the event.

TRAC’s school project gains momentum

The second phase of the Trans African Concessions (TRAC) School Project proved to be a huge success, reaching hundreds of children along the N4 Toll Route.

The programme, which was officially launched at the end of 2014, focuses on road-safety education for children from five to nine years and is directly in line with TRAC’s CSI responsibilities. As with Phase 1, the second one was headed by TRAC’s official life-size mascot, Sipho, who visited 10 schools in four days to teach learners the basic rules of the road in a fun, memorable, yet informative manner.

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“Sipho and the TRAC team visited schools in Tshwane, Middelburg, Belfast, Mbombela and Komatipoort and we were blown away by the positive response from our hosts,” says TRAC communications manager, Solange Soares-Nicholson. “It is obvious that the campaign has gained momentum since its launch in November, because this time around we even had parents and teachers phoning us to commend us for reaching them through their children.”

The project once again involved Sipho and several TRAC representatives who held various activities, which included an educational road-safety clip. During each visit learners were taught how TRAC was playing a pivotal role in the construction and maintenance of the N4 Toll Route. It also highlighted the customer-care service it offered to road users such as its 24-hour Helpdesk and emergency-response service. These include response to, and assistance with all emergencies and incidents on the N4 Toll Route, as well as general enquiries.

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“The children at every school were eager to learn about road regulations, especially when it focused on how they and the drivers should behave in the vehicle. It was enlightening to see how they reacted to our much-loved Sipho and it was amazing how they absorbed the information he passed on.”

“The idea behind the initiative is to establish a culture of road-safety consciousness among our youth and to reach adults through their kids’ eagerness to learn and share their knowledge,” Soares-Nicholson says. “The children of today are the motorists of tomorrow, and if they start respecting and understanding road rules from a tender age, it will eventually become second nature to them.”

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A Facebook competition, with a prize of gift vouchers to the value of R1000 for three winners at one of three malls also formed part of this campaign, thus encouraging youngsters (and their parents) to become even more involved in promoting and practicing road safety. The response to it is proof that project is having the intended reach and effect and TRAC hopes that it will further encourage safe driving practices and thus prevent accidents.TRAC also intends to launch a pedestrian-safety campaign at rural schools along the route to educate learners on this most vital matter. More information on this particular project will be available closer to the time of it being launched.

TRAC offers young children a head start on road safety

This year was a year of change and innovation within TRAC. The appointment of a new CEO, as well as new managers in certain departments, brought with it different ideas and strategies aimed at improving our brand and services thus making the use of the N4 Toll Route more pleasurable, memorable and safer for road users.
The TRAC School Project was one of the fresh ideas implemented by the new dispensation and was officially launched on the 10th of November at Curro Meridian School in Nelspruit. The initiative, which ran until the 17th of November, saw TRAC visit 11 schools in five days and promote and teach road safety to children in a way never before done by a South African road concessionaire.

This road safety education campaign was aimed at preprimary and primary schools along our 570km route and what made it unique, and very special, was that it was headed by TRAC’s official life-size mascot, Sipho.

“The idea behind the initiative was to start establishing a culture of road-safety consciousness among our youth and to reach adults through their kids’ eagerness to learn and share their knowledge,” communications manager of TRAC, Solange Soares-Nicholson says. “The children of today are the motorists of tomorrow, and if they start respecting and understanding road rules from this tender age, it will eventually become second nature to them.”

The project involved Sipho and several TRAC representatives who held activations at the 11 selected schools along the route. The larger-than-life puppet visited all the respective schools, along with TRAC’s promotional team, and taught four- to nine-year-old children the basic rules of the road in a fun, memorable, yet informative manner. The activations included a talk on road safety as well as the screening of an educational road-safety clip. The children were also taught how TRAC plays a pivotal road in keeping the N4 Toll Route safe and all the services that are offered by our 24-hour Helpdesk and TRACAssist teams. These include response to and assistance with all emergencies and incidents on the N4 Toll Route as well as general enquiries.

A Facebook competition, with a prize of gift vouchers to the value of R1 000 for three winners at one of three malls, also formed part of this campaign, thus encouraging youngsters (and their parents) to become even more involved in the promoting and practising of road safety.

“This campaign is novel to TRAC and we are very excited about its possibilities. There are simply too many accidents on our country’s roads and it is TRAC’s responsibility as concessionaires of South Africa’s only trans-border toll route, to promote safe driving and travelling,” explains Soares-Nicholson.

The initiative was such a great success that TRAC plans to hold a similar campaign next year, just prior to the Easter weekend.